Project Type describes the format of the project overall, such as a documentary, commercial, or social media video. Videos can have multiple Project Types. For instance, a "Documentary" and "Interview", or "Commercial" and "Lifestyle". 


Animation:

Description:

Animation can be solely used to create the visuals for an entire piece, or in concert with live action to add clarity or style.  Animation is typically made in two dimensions but occasionally can feature simple three dimensional visuals.

Distinction:

Animation is typically easily distinguished from other visuals but it should be noted that occasionally simple animations are often added by editors that have been downloaded from ready made sites, and not actually animated for the spot.  It's important not to tag projects with these assets as animation.  It's also important to note that animation must comprise the entire frame of the video for some or all of its running time.  Animation added atop live action will almost always be considered Motion Graphics and not Animation.

Branded Entertainment

Description:

Branded Entertainment is a form of video content where you focus on creating a piece of entertainment first, which then happens to feature or be sponsored by your product. This is different from product placement, where a company pays a movie studio to have their product featured in their film. Instead, for Branded Entertainment pieces, the company pays for the cost to produce the entire piece of entertainment, and then acts as a sponsor or places their product in the piece to reap the benefits.

Examples of these tend to mimic typical entertainment pieces, think hidden camera stunts, reality style filming, etc. They can also feature a storytelling element, like telling stories of incredible people or experiences. They can also even extend into multi episode shows or even movies (the ultimate example is probably The Lego Movie). Additionally, they tend to take the form of enterainment formats; longer length, documentary style of filming, etc. as opposed to traditional :15 / :30 / :60 second commercial ads.

Distinction:

The defining factor in Branded Entertainment is: Does this seem like a piece of content designed to tell a story or entertain me? Or does it seem like an ad for a product? Branded Entertainment should feel like the first, and should have little mention or hard selling of the product. Sometimes the product won't even be mentioned at all and it will simply be sponsored by the company at the beginning or end. "Brought to you by.." or "Sponsored by.." are usually signs of a Branded Entertainment piece.

Commercial

Description:

Commercial spots are defined mostly by their format and overall look. Commercial spots are typically :15, :30 or :60 seconds in length, and have a clean, crisp commercial look. 

Distinction:

Attaining the distinction of being a "Commercial" requires the spot to have a certain quality of polish that separates it from specs, docu style shoots, etc. When you see a commercial, you can typically tell that it was shot by a high quality, experienced crew. They should have excellent cinematography, and have a polished, professional look. Videos venturing into the realm of infomercials, spec spots or web spots, would not be considered a Commercial. Everything tagged as Commercial should have a high-end commercial look and feel.

Corporate 

Description:

Corporate Videos are typically made for companies to communicate their values, train employees, communicate internally, or generate positive publicity. They don't feel like ads, and instead focus more on things like customer case studies, recruitment videos, training videos or explanations of their business processes.

Distinction:

Corporate Videos are not trying to sell you on the product(s) or service(s) the company featured in them typically provide, though their brand may be heavily featured in the video.

Documentary 

Description:

Documentaries focus on real life subjects and stories, usually featuring real people speaking in interviews with footage to support the story.

Distinction:

Just because a video is for a product or company, doesn't mean it can't still be a documentary. Many companies choose to tell their story in a documentary style, featuring interviews and supporting footage. The Documentary is more of a distinction in the style of filming, and using real life subjects.

However, be careful to not confuse this with customer testimonials, which would more likely fall under Interview, Corporate, or even Commercial depending on the look and format. Documentaries should have a story telling element.

Explainer 

Description:

Explainers seek to quickly explain a product or service through use of straightforward language and direction. Explainers typically crossover with many other types of videos and may also be Product, Animation, Commercial, How-To, Social, or many other formats.

Distinction:

The key distinction of an Explainer video is that it is trying to explain something to you in a straightforward format. It could be a Problem / Solution format (i.e. here's the problem everyone experiences, and here's how our product solves it), or it could be more of a feature based explainer (i.e. here's our product, and here's all the features and how they work). Either way, they are typically very straightforward and seek to quickly show the viewer how some new product or service works.

How-To 

Description:

How-To videos typically describe how to do something in a step-by-step guide.

Distinction:

How-To videos can seem very similar to Explainer videos, but the key distinction is that they typically follow a step-by-step format (I.e. Step 1, Step 2, Step 3) and focus in on one specific task. For instance, how to set up this new product, or how to use a product to accomplish it's goal (in a step-by-step format). While Explainers focus on the big picture of what a product is and how it helps you, How-To videos focus on the technical step-by-step process of using the product.

Interview 

Description:

Interview videos simply feature someone being interviewed on camera.

Distinction:

This is a simple category, and one that may cross over with many other formats such as Documentary, Commercial, Corporate and more. As long as it features someone being interviewed on camera, it should be categorized as Interview.  It's important to note that interviews that aren't shot on camera (like VO over B-Roll) do not qualify for an interview tag.

Lifestyle 

Description:

Lifestyle videos feature footage of people experiencing life, without delivering lines or acting out scenes per se. Things like hanging out at the beach, hiking, exercising, going to work, hanging out with friends, etc.

Distinction:

Lifestyle footage is typically used to complement products, and is used often in fashion, fitness and beauty spots. While the actors on-screen may not be delivering any lines or acting out any specific scene, they are casually modeling or using the products as they go about their lives. Look for anytime you see footage of actors who aren't delivering lines, and generally seem to be living their life, having fun, working out, etc.  

It's important to note that lifestyle is almost always staged and not found in the world like a documentary should be.  Keep this in mind when deciding if something features lifestyle or not.

Live Event

Description:

Live Event videos feature live events, such as speakers, performances, sporting events, etc.

Distinction:

Live Events typically are defined as pre-planned events that people come to see, such as conferences, sporting events, etc. Things such as hidden camera pranks, or reality style videos would typically fall under Branded Entertainment instead.

Live Music 

Description:

Live Music videos feature live performances of musicians. They typically center around concert promos or recaps.

Distinction:

A musical performance in a music video or narrative film requires different skills and is not the same as recording a live musical performance and should not be tagged as such.

Music Video 

Description:

A music video created for a song, sometimes including a story or several staged performances.

Distinction:

Sometimes music videos can be utilized in other executions such as Commercials or Branded Entertainment. Music Videos may often fall under multiple formats.  Live performances are not Music Videos.

Narrative:

Description:

The sole purpose of a narrative piece is to tell a story, be it in a short film, or feature film.  For our purposes, please keep Narrative submissions to under 15 minutes.  

Distinction:

Many ads can feature heavy use of Narrative techniques and it's important to note before tagging your work as Narrative that the piece has a clear beginning, middle, and end, or a character changing over the course of the piece's run time.  Any explicit selling of a product or service in an ad does not qualify it as a Narrative.

Product 

Description:

Product videos are focused on a single product, usually in the consumer space, and serve to highlight the product's features. 

Distinction:

Think of product videos as tangible products you can hold in your hand, although they can also be abstract products such as apps, etc. Also, product videos are typically highly focused on the product and its features, and usually contain carefully composed shots of the product itself.


Reel:

Description:

A reel is a collection of works from one creative, usually highlighting a single role they've performed on all the selected works in the reel.  They are oftentimes 1-2 minutes in length.

Distinction:

While a reel can help with your application to the network, whole works are always preferred to show the entirety of what you can contribute to a project, from beginning to end.  Reels submitted to the network must not have any personal information to be featured on your profile.

Sizzle

Description:

A sizzle can be many things, such as a trailer for a new show, a mashup of exciting clips to promote a new product, etc. Think of a sizzle as a high impact teaser that is meant to build excitement for something.

Distinction:

Sizzles are meant to either build excitement for something, or to recap events in a way that makes them seem exciting and powerful. It could be a teaser of a new product launch, or it could be a recap showing how many awards a product won in the last year. The key tenets are energy and excitement.

Social Media 

Description:

Social Media videos are typically made for platforms such as Instagram or Facebook, and are meant to be attention grabbing, shareable and easy to watch.

Distinction:

Social Media videos are often short, easy to watch, and often include eye catching camera tricks such as stop motion, or fast editing, as well as poppy colors that attract attention. They are also often formatted in square or vertical resolutions for mobile phones. None of these are requirements for labeling something as a Social Media video, but just examples of common executions.

Viral 

Description:

Viral videos are designed for maximum shareability and usually include over-the-top ideas or characters that are designed to elicit strong reactions. Common examples are Dollar Shave Club, Purple, etc.

Distinction:

In order for something to be classified as Viral it doesn't necessarily need to have a million views, but it does need to fall in the realm of over-the-top and designed to elicit strong reactions, whether that may be laughter, tears, or even anger. Categorizing something as Viral is more about assessing its ability to stand out from the crowd and potentially be something that will be shared excessively.

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